To run code when your component is destroyed, use onDestroy.

For example, we can add a setInterval function when our component initialises, and clean it up when it's no longer relevant. Doing so prevents memory leaks.

<script>
	import { onDestroy } from 'svelte';

	let counter = 0;
	const interval = setInterval(() => counter += 1, 1000);

	onDestroy(() => clearInterval(interval));
</script>

While it's important to call lifecycle functions during the component's initialisation, it doesn't matter where you call them from. So if we wanted, we could abstract the interval logic into a helper function in utils.js...

import { onDestroy } from 'svelte';

export function onInterval(callback, milliseconds) {
	const interval = setInterval(callback, milliseconds);

	onDestroy(() => {
		clearInterval(interval);
	});
}

...and import it into our component:

<script>
	import { onInterval } from './utils.js';

	let counter = 0;
	onInterval(() => counter += 1, 1000);
</script>

Open and close the timer a few times and make sure the counter keeps ticking and the CPU load increases. This is due to a memory leak as the previous timers are not deleted. Don't forget to refresh the page before solving the example.



		
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